Is Recycling A Waste Of Time, Money, And Energy?

If we do not take the problem to sort and clean all those recyclable plastics, papers, and tins, most of us feel guilty. We do this to avoid tossing them in the bin, which, then, eventually ends up in landfills throughout the nation. How beneficial is recycling and can it really fix the “waste crisis”?

There has been a lot of hubbub recently about the waste that has been put out for recycling ending up in landfills. It can be cheaper to carry it to other nations than to recycle it or fill up the landfills located in the UK.

Unless the UK hits these targets, local council tax expenses across the UK will skyrocket, unless local authorities hit their recycling targets to allow the UK to strike their targets set by the EU. The UK federal government currently charges tax for dumping waste in garbage dump sites to encourage us to recycle more and this tax is due to increase.

This will penalize regional councils which continue to utilize landfills and council taxpayers will pay the rate for a bad performance by not recycling themselves or by not having the centers to do this. It’s, therefore, cheaper to recycle than to discard in the landfill sites. The UK presently recycles 22 percent of its home waste while some other EU nations recycle more than half. The UK proposes cutting the quantity of waste took into garbage dump websites from 72 percent today to 25 percent by 2020.

Some Thing to Think About: The Future?

(1) Why do we utilize all that energy recycling paper to save the trees? There is a good argument that paper needs to be recycled so that we conserve forests and trees, but we now grow trees just to produce newsprint and other items. Is it a sustainable resource currently?

(2) New landfills are built in the USA and this should happen in the UK on a big scale which would allow the UK to pipe the methane gas that they produce to local power plants supplying houses in a green and eco-method.

(3) We require to make sure that any recycling programs that are run are delivered efficiently. That means tracing waste down the chain to its last location. Openness and transparency ought to inform the entire waste management market.

(3) If a study is undertaken and it concludes that it costs more to recycle than to bury the used and make the new from scratch, then we could start garbage dumps simply for plastic, one for glass, and so on. Then, if we do run out of them, we can dig them all up in one go for recycling.

(4) At present, just an approximated fifteen percent of UK homes have access to curbside collection, but these collections do not cover glass, paper, plastic, etc.  The obvious next question: How far do you have to drive to the closest recycling center and how much do you have to gather at the house to ensure that you are not making more damage by driving than the quantity of energy you are saving by recycling? What about the monetary expense to collect the recycling or to take it to the recycling center?

There has been a lot of publicity, just recently, about the garbage that has been put out for recycling ending up in landfills. It can be cheaper to carry it to other nations than to recycle it or fill up the landfill sites in the UK. The UK federal government already charges tax for dumping waste in landfill sites to motivate us to recycle more and this tax is due to increase.

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